About

EnviroDIY™ is Presented by Stroud™ Water Research Center

The founding members of EnviroDIY are all scientists and educators of Stroud Water Research Center, an independent not-for-profit organization that seeks to advance knowledge and stewardship of freshwater systems through global research, education, and restoration.

Since 1967, Stroud Center scientists and educators have been focused on one thing — fresh water.

While our research concentrates on streams and rivers — including how they function as a whole and the complex web of life that inhabits them — there’s a much larger story behind our efforts. The health of these freshwater ecosystems is our first line of defense in preserving clean water — and clean water is essential to all life.

Only through knowing how healthy streams and rivers work, and what happens when they become polluted, can we determine how to protect and preserve this vital resource. Learn more at www.stroudcenter.org

EnviroDIY: A Community of Enthusiasts Sharing Do-It-Yourself Ideas for Environmental Science and Monitoring

Our vision is that sharing of ideas and experiences by the EnviroDIY community will result in open-source hardware and software solutions for observing our environment that are low cost, easy to learn, and easy to use, which will lead to an explosion of high-quality real-time data that transforms the practice of environmental science, resource monitoring, and watershed protection.

All EnviroDIY members can showcase their environmental sensing gadgets or describe their own homegrown approaches to monitoring, sensor calibration, installation hardware, radio communication, data management, training or any number of other topics. Members can pose and answer questions and can network within interest groups to collectively develop new devices, tutorials, or other useful products.

EnviroDIY was inspired by DIY Drones, an online community of about 60,000 amateur designers and builders of unmanned aerial vehicles; Weather Underground, a website that aggregates data from the backyard weather stations installed by citizen-scientists; and Public Lab, a collaborative community developing open, citizen-science tools for environmental exploration and investigation.